WEBINAR: "BIOMASS EMISSIONS: ARE THEY BEING ACCOUNTED WELL?"

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The methodology used to estimate emissions at the national level must clearly distinguish obsolete and inefficient equipment from technified biomass systems, which fully comply with the Ecodesign regulations.

AVEBIOM organizes the 23 February the free webinar “Emissions from biomass. Are they accounting well? " to show that the methodology used to estimate emissions must clearly distinguish obsolete and inefficient equipment from technified biomass systems, which fully comply with the Ecodesign regulations.

Christoph Schmidl, researcher at the Austrian technology center BEST (Bioenergy and Sustainable Technologies GmbH) will explain in detail the analysis carried out in 2019 on the air pollutant inventory method of the Austrian Federal Environment Agency, which concluded with the revision and update of the emission factor for modern biomass equipment.

The importance of defining a suitable emission factor

Austrian researchers proposed a change in the emission factor used for modern biomass equipment and a more accurate distribution of the number of modern equipment vs obsolete to make a more realistic emission calculation, after finding that:

  • PM10 particulate emissions from biomass heating systems have been overestimated due to a misalignment between obsolete and modern technologies.
  • Modern biomass boilers and stoves generate far fewer emissions than those globally assigned to heating with woody biofuels.

The Austrian Federal Environment Agency has already updated its methodology by adopting these changes. The transalpine country could reduce its emissions by up to 2050% in 90 in a 100% renewable air conditioning scenario in which the participation of technified biomass systems would increase.

Other countries, such as the United Kingdom or the Netherlands, have also revised their air pollutant inventory methodologies and have been able to observe how the contribution of biomass to particulate emissions decreases significantly.

Modern biomass boilers and stoves generate far fewer emissions than those globally assigned to heating with woody biofuels; the problem is in the old wood equipment, which needs to be replaced.

About the speaker

Christoph Schmidl He is a Doctor from the Vienna University of Technology with 15 years of research on the energy use of biomass. His professional career took him from the Vienna University of Technology to BEST (formerly Bioenergy2020 +), where he currently works as principal investigator.

In addition, he leads a Master program in renewable energy systems and technical energy management at the University of Applied Sciences Wr. Neustadt since 2013 and represents Austria in a working group of the Technological Collaboration Program (TCP) of the International Agency of Energy.

 

The webinar is free and has a simultaneous translation service

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